Author Topic: A Visit to the Studebaker Museum in South Bend, Indiana  (Read 15127 times)

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Offline Otto Puzzell

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A Visit to the Studebaker Museum in South Bend, Indiana
« on: August 22, 2009, 08:28:57 am »
Earlier this week, I combined a camping tip to Northern Indiana with a visit to the Studebaker National Museum in South Bend, Indiana. I apologize  for quality of some of these pics. The myriad lights in the display halls wreaked havoc with my cheesy old camera digital camera, which is of mid-1990's vintage. And keeping two pre-teens in check resulted in many pics being rushed. The vehicle information below is transcribed from the placards displayed with the exhibits.

Part I - in the beginning


Conestoga Wagon
This Conestoga was the original wagon that J. C. Studebaker built to bring the family's belongings to South Bend. True to it's roots, Studebaker continued to use the Conestoga name for wagon for decades to come.


1857 Studebaker Phaeton
H&C Studebaker built this phaeton in 1857, and it is the oldest surviving Studebaker vehicle. Henry Studebaker crafted the carriage's irons, and Patrick O'Brien applied its paint. J.M. Studebaker acquired this Phaeton for the company's historic vehicle collection in 1908, after giving its owner a new buggy in exchange. Studebaker built this carriage as a premium for one of South Bend's first fairs.


1863 Hearse
Along with farm wagons and passenger carriages, Studebaker also built funerary hearses. This Landau-style hearse belonged to the Forest G. Hay funeral home in South Bend. A trap door in the floor allowed a person to stand inside while claening the interior.


1905 Studebaker Sleigh
Studebaker's complete line of horse-drawn equipment also included luxurious slieghs. These were marketed to well-to-do csutomers, and due to their seasonal use, they were never big sellers. This sleigh was sold at the Studebaker Repository on Michigan avenue in Chicago. Studebaker ads described the sleigh as perfect for customers experiencing "the busy Winter season and its many social demands".


1911 Electric Coupe
Studebaker built 1,841 electric automobiles between 1902 and 1912. During those years, the compnay also offered a full line of electric commercial vehicles. This coupe has a top speed of 21 miles per hour and a range of 70 miles. It features a 48-volt Westinghouse motor and 970 pounds of batteries. This car sold for $1,850 wnen new.

« Last Edit: August 22, 2009, 08:39:04 am by Otto Puzzell »
Will they gaze at a strip mall where a field had once been? Will they think they're born late like the way we now do it? Or will they curse at the present and lend credence to it? Will they hear all the old songs and think they're all true and hate all their own songs and everything new?

Offline Ultra

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Re: A Visit to the Studebaker Museum in South Bend, Indiana
« Reply #1 on: August 22, 2009, 01:13:45 pm »
As you get this one fleshed out let's use it on the front page.

 :)
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Offline Otto Puzzell

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Re: A Visit to the Studebaker Museum in South Bend, Indiana
« Reply #2 on: August 30, 2009, 08:09:56 am »
Part II      


1904 Studebaker Model C
This is the oldest existing gasoline-powered Studebaker, After 2-years of producing electric-powered automobiles, the company introduced its first gasoline cars for 1904. These cars were built in association with the Garford Company of Elyria, Ohio. Garford built the chassis, while Studebaker supplied the coachwork. The car sold new for $1,600, and was powered by a 2-cylinder engine rated at 16 HP. A canopy top was optional, for $150 more.


1910 E.M.F. "30" Touring
Studebaker entered an agreement with the Everett-Metzger-Flanders company in 1909 to sell E.M.F automobiles through Studebaker's dealer network. In 1911, Studebaker acquired E.M.F, and the name died at the end of the 1912 run. This model had a 4-cyliner engine rated at 30 HP, and sold new for a cool $1,000. Over 40,000 E.M.F. automobiles were sold between 1909 and 1912.


1912 Flanders 20
The Flanders "20" was Studebaker's entry-level model for 1912. The car was available as either a four-door Touring car or a two-door Roadster. Over 30,000 Flanders automobiles were built from 1909 to 1912. The four-cylinder engine was rated at 20HP, and the car listed for $1,000. The Flanders' rear axle shafts were prone to breaking, and Studebaker spent a considerable sum replacing them, at no charge to their customer.


1913 Model 25 Touring Sedan
The 1913 Studebaker line was noted for being exceptionally rugged and reliable. The Model 25 Touring Sedan is powered by a 4-cylinder engine and featured a rear-mounted transaxle, a setup Studebaker would use until 1918. The engine displaced 192 CI and was rated at 24 horsepower. This model sold for $885. 1913 Was the first year that Studebaker cars carried only the Studebaker name.


1913 Studebaker E6 Touring
In 1913, Studebaker also offered its first 6-cylinder models, in either touring or limousine body styles. The company sold over 36,000 cars in 1913, good enough to rank fourth in the US automotibile industy. The engine is 6-cylinder models displaced 288 CI, and were rated at 40 HP. All Studebaker engines in 1913 were fed by a Holley Carburetors.


1916 Six Coupe
Studebaker's unique Coupe was advertised as a "convenient car for physicians and professional men" and was informally referred to as a "Doctor's Coupe" or "Opera Coupe". The Studebaker Coupes were available only with six-cylinder engines, rated at 50 HP. This example sold new for $1750, and like all Studebakers of this vintage, came equipped with a complete set of tools.


1919 Studebaker Big Six
This Big Six was purchased new for $2,000 in Santa Barbara, California. It logged more than 90,000 miles in and around Santa Barbara in less than two years of use on mostly unimproved roads. By 1923, this car had accumulated 390,000 miles. Studebaker purchased the car from the owner in 1924, and used it as a promotional vehicle. The Big Six engine - Studebaker's first with a detachable cylinder head, displaced 353 CI, and was rated at 60 HP.


1920 Studebaker Light Six
Prior to 1920, all Studebaker Automobiles were produced in Detroit, while  horse-drawn vehicle production remained in South Bend, Indiana. This Light Six sold for $1,485 when new. The six-cylinder engine displaces 207 CI, and is rated at 40 HP. This example is the first Studebaker automobile built entirely in South Bend, and caries serial number 1.
« Last Edit: August 30, 2009, 08:21:57 am by Otto Puzzell »
Will they gaze at a strip mall where a field had once been? Will they think they're born late like the way we now do it? Or will they curse at the present and lend credence to it? Will they hear all the old songs and think they're all true and hate all their own songs and everything new?

Offline knightfan26917

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Re: A Visit to the Studebaker Museum in South Bend, Indiana
« Reply #3 on: September 03, 2009, 11:03:55 pm »
VERY nice, Otto.

Thanks for sharing the pictures with us!

:)



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Offline Otto Puzzell

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Re: A Visit to the Studebaker Museum in South Bend, Indiana
« Reply #4 on: September 13, 2009, 08:43:18 am »
Her's another batch...


1926 Big Six Duplex Phaeton
Studebakers top-of-the-line Big Six boasted a 353 CI six-cylinder engine. The Duplex Phaeton body style was introduced in 1925, and combined the protection of a sedan with the openness of a touring car. The car featured a rigid roof with side curtains that pulled down from the roof. Studebaker continued to use the name "Phaeton" as a holdover from their days as a carriage builder. The term originally designated a carriage with a nominal body and large, lightly-sprung wheels.


1927 Commander
In 1927, David Abbot "Ab" Jenkins drove this Commander Sedan from New York City to San Francisco in record time. Jenkins left New York at 8:00 PM on August 30, and arrived in San Francisco at 10:40 PM on September 2. He had covered 3.302 miles in 77 hours and 40 minutes, besting the existing record by one hour. The record Jenkins broke was his own, set 1 year earlier in a Studebaker Big Six Duplex Phaeton.


1928 Commander Roadster
In October 1927, three Studebaker Commanders established speed and endurance records at Atlantic City, New Jersey. This commander traveled 25,000 miles in under 23,000 minutes at Atlantic City, averaging over 65 MPH. The official timekeeper's clock was not stopped during the Commander's 25,000 mile run, not even for pit stops or driver changes. The car subsequently toured the country as part of a Studebaker promotional campaign. This car has an 85 HP, 353 CI engine, and listed for $1,510 when new. 



1932 President Convertible Coupe
All 1932 Presidents featured new bodies and rode on a 135-inch wheelbase. Rear-hinged doors and spoked "artillery" wheels also were new that year. This is one of fewer than ten 1932 President Convertible Coups known to exist. In 1932, Studebaker introduced a synchromesh transmission that allowed smooth shifting without double-clutching. In this car, it was mated to a 337 CI straight eight that was rated at 122 HP. This car sold for $1,940 when new.


1935 Studebaker Commander Roadster
Studebaker's 1935 vehicles introduced major mechanical and safety improvements. Four wheel hydraulic brakes and safety glass were standard, and independent front suspension was available as an option. Yellow was not a regular production color, but could be special-ordered for a $15 premium over the car's $895 list price. This car was powered by a 150 CI straight eight that was rated at 107 HP.

More to come...
Will they gaze at a strip mall where a field had once been? Will they think they're born late like the way we now do it? Or will they curse at the present and lend credence to it? Will they hear all the old songs and think they're all true and hate all their own songs and everything new?

Offline Otto Puzzell

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Re: A Visit to the Studebaker Museum in South Bend, Indiana
« Reply #5 on: October 04, 2009, 10:51:49 am »
Part III - Sublime, and Ridiculous


1941 President Skyway Sedan Coupe
The President Skyway Sedan Coupe offered six passenger comfort and an eight-cylinder rated at 117bhp in a sporty-looking body style.


1947 M5 Half-Ton Pickup
Studebaker's M-Series trucks debuted in 1941 and marked the company's successful entry into the light truck market. The M-Series was available in capacities from one half to two tons, and remained in production through 1948. This truck is fitted with optional fog lights, radio, and overdrive transmission. Help keeping manufacturing costs down were interchangeable front and rear fenders. This truck was equipped with the 90 HP 170 cubic inch 6. This vehicle listed for $1,082 when new.


1952 Commander Starliner
In 1952, Studebaker introduced the popular Hardtop body style in both the Commander and Champion lines. The company celebrated its centennial on February 16, 1952, and supplied the Pace Car for that year's Indianapolis 500. $2.448 brought home this V8 Hardtop.




1953 Champion Starliner Hardtop
Featured on many "Most Beautiful Automobile" lists, the 1953 Starliner was Studebaker's design masterpiece. The car's design was a product of Raymond Loewy Associates, under the direction of stylist Robert Bourke. Priced at $2,116 with an inline six, the 1953 models were the only ones to feature the three-pointed star emblem. A complaint from Mercedes-Benz resulted in different badging for subsequent years.


1956 President Classic
Studebaker's sedans underwent a major styling change for 1956. Company executives blamed the dramatic look of the 1953-1955 models for their slow sales, and insisted on a return to the more conventional design seen here.


1957 Golden Hawk 400
4 short years later, the beautiful 53's had been festooned with wings and seemingly troweled-on chrome. The Golden Hawk, powered by a supercharged 275 HP V8, was one of the faster vehicles on the road in 1957. The limited edition Golden Hawk 400 was introduced in the early spring of 1957 and featured hand-crafted leather and special paint. Only 41 of these $4,208 cars were made.


1961 Champ Truck
With the success of the 1959 Lark, Studebaker designers applied the Lark's styling to the company's new light trucks for 1960. The Champ truck line bolstered Studebaker's flagging commercial vehicle sales, down over 75 percent from a decade earlier. The Champ took the cost saving measures of the M-series truck s to the next level. The Champ shared more than looks with the Lark. Doors, instrument panels and front fenders were shared with the Lark.

Next Up - End of Days, and some Oddities from the Museum Basement.
« Last Edit: October 04, 2009, 10:55:55 am by Otto Puzzell »
Will they gaze at a strip mall where a field had once been? Will they think they're born late like the way we now do it? Or will they curse at the present and lend credence to it? Will they hear all the old songs and think they're all true and hate all their own songs and everything new?

Offline MG

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Re: A Visit to the Studebaker Museum in South Bend, Indiana
« Reply #6 on: October 28, 2009, 08:20:59 am »
I must say, those are some very handsome automobiles, from the very first ones onward.  I always thought Studebaker stood for the proposition that a good idea counts for little if it arrives at the wrong time. Most of the Studebakers were a decade or more ahead of their contemporaries, at least in styling. Don't know much about their mechanical worthiness. I seem to remember reading some disparaging things about their V-8 engines back in the 50's. But back then, any car with more than 50,000 miles on it was considered a "survivor".

All I can say is, I would love to own just about any one of the cars in that collection.    ;)
Life is not measured by the number of breaths you take, but by the number of moments that take your breath away!

Offline Ultra

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Re: A Visit to the Studebaker Museum in South Bend, Indiana
« Reply #7 on: November 05, 2009, 12:43:49 pm »
Nice article, MG and Otto.

 8)
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Offline MG

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Re: A Visit to the Studebaker Museum in South Bend, Indiana
« Reply #8 on: November 05, 2009, 04:39:05 pm »
Thanks, Ultra. Otto was very kind to allow me to use his photos.

I promised myself I would write and post 100 articles before even thinking about my return on investment for the hours put in. I CAN say that my monetary rewards doubled from September, when I started, to October, my second month. If I remember my math correctly from 50 years ago, I will be earning over a million dollars a month at this by January of 2019!    ;D

Being serious for a moment, which is hard for me, given the opportunity, I would definitely put the Studebaker Museum on my to-do list. Maybe next time I am at Notre Dame applying for a scholarship in their theological studies program!    :lmao:
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Re: A Visit to the Studebaker Museum in South Bend, Indiana
« Reply #9 on: November 06, 2009, 01:24:47 am »
ROI or not your articles are appreciated.
“Honi soit qui mal y pense”


Click the pic....... Name the car

Offline MG

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Re: A Visit to the Studebaker Museum in South Bend, Indiana
« Reply #10 on: November 06, 2009, 06:49:18 am »
Let's just say I am not yet a wealthy man from this endeavor, at least not in monetary terms. But I get quite a lot of satisfaction out of doing these pieces. I always fancied myself as a budding automotive journalist. After all, I have been a certified car nut since the 50's and cars have always played a rather disproportionate role in my life.

I usually sit down at the computer about 7 ayem (with the cat draped across the lower half of the machine) and write an article a day. Some of my early stories were drivel, its true. But I think I am getting better at this, as, with all human endeavor, we gain proficiency by doing.


And its not like these were photos from the Trabant museum here. I have a genuine affection for Studebaker automobiles, which, in many ways, led all other manufacturers into the future. The Raymond Loewy era particularly offers some stunning automobiles that were WAY ahead of their contemporaries. Perhaps too far ahead. But I still think there might be a Stude in my future. If the right opportunity comes along.

In the meantime, to paraphrase Euphrates or Eucalyptus or whoever that smart old Greek was: I write because I can!    :bow:

As an aside, I write the article, then proof read it several times, then read it again in preview mode, make edits, preview it again until I am happy with it, then publish it, the read it online in published form. Invariably, I find either typos or language that I think can be smoothed a little (or a lot!), so I go back and re-edit, preview again, re-upload it. Then I wait about 10 minutes to see the finished article appear on AutoPuzzles, where I read it again (which helps boost my view count!) and almost always find more stuff that is wrong or just doesn't sound right to my ear and so I go back and make more changes.

On average, I would say that I edit each piece about 10 times before I leave it alone. And STILL there are typos, bad punctuation and other glitches that I hear about later. Mark Twain once said no piece of writing is ever "done". There are always changes that could be made. But at some point, you have to put the pen (or keyboard) down and say "Ahhhh, that's close enough for government work" and let your creation go before moving on to the next project.

I am enormously grateful for the support AutoPuzzles has given me. And to Otto for sharing his pixs with me. Currently, I am negotiating with faksta on an article about racing in Russia. He insists on being paid in rubles, but I am holding out for IPA's at dusk on my deck as the sun paints the sky russet and mauve as in the attached photo!   :drink:

Enjoy your day, all! 
« Last Edit: November 06, 2009, 09:24:56 am by MG »
Life is not measured by the number of breaths you take, but by the number of moments that take your breath away!

Offline Otto Puzzell

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Re: A Visit to the Studebaker Museum in South Bend, Indiana
« Reply #11 on: November 06, 2009, 09:18:39 am »
Hey! I'm famous!  :D
Will they gaze at a strip mall where a field had once been? Will they think they're born late like the way we now do it? Or will they curse at the present and lend credence to it? Will they hear all the old songs and think they're all true and hate all their own songs and everything new?

Offline MG

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Re: A Visit to the Studebaker Museum in South Bend, Indiana
« Reply #12 on: November 06, 2009, 09:39:27 am »
You always were, Otto. Its just that nobody knew it!    :lmao:
Life is not measured by the number of breaths you take, but by the number of moments that take your breath away!

Offline Otto Puzzell

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Re: A Visit to the Studebaker Museum in South Bend, Indiana
« Reply #13 on: November 06, 2009, 10:38:39 am »
I suppose you're right.

By the way, I think you write for the same reason I work on this site: it's an avocation, not a paying job.
Will they gaze at a strip mall where a field had once been? Will they think they're born late like the way we now do it? Or will they curse at the present and lend credence to it? Will they hear all the old songs and think they're all true and hate all their own songs and everything new?

Offline MG

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Re: A Visit to the Studebaker Museum in South Bend, Indiana
« Reply #14 on: November 06, 2009, 11:01:23 am »
Precisely so.   ;)
Life is not measured by the number of breaths you take, but by the number of moments that take your breath away!

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Re: A Visit to the Studebaker Museum in South Bend, Indiana
« Reply #15 on: November 06, 2009, 07:02:53 pm »
Currently, I am negotiating with faksta on an article about racing in Russia. He insists on being paid in rubles, but I am holding out for IPA's at dusk on my deck as the sun paints the sky russet and mauve as in the attached photo! 

To be more precise, I requested used rubles in a small change (10 and 50) delivered by DHL. See no yellow wagon outside yet...

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Re: A Visit to the Studebaker Museum in South Bend, Indiana
« Reply #16 on: November 07, 2009, 05:54:28 am »
I called DHL and they said their driver was on his way, but had to make a stop at the vodka factory first.  He might be a while getting to your house!   :drink:
Life is not measured by the number of breaths you take, but by the number of moments that take your breath away!

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Re: A Visit to the Studebaker Museum in South Bend, Indiana
« Reply #17 on: November 07, 2009, 03:36:53 pm »
Well, the last installment is up! 

I must say I rather enjoyed this project. Quite a few cars in that collection I wouldn't mind having in my driveway.   :yeah:

Thanks again, Otto. Your Instamatic takes pretty good photographs!   :hail:
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Re: A Visit to the Studebaker Museum in South Bend, Indiana
« Reply #18 on: November 10, 2009, 10:00:06 am »
Nice shots - that one with 475k miles on it is impressive for a car from any era never mind 1919!

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Re: A Visit to the Studebaker Museum in South Bend, Indiana
« Reply #19 on: November 20, 2009, 08:03:57 am »
I think part of that can be attributed to the fact that engines of that era did not have detachable cylinder heads. Can you imagine what doing routine maintenance on those beasts must have been like?  Reminds me of the shop manual for my XK-E, in which every procedure short of putting air in the tires and demisting the windscreen began with those ominous words:  Remove engine from car....... :P
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Re: A Visit to the Studebaker Museum in South Bend, Indiana
« Reply #20 on: July 15, 2012, 12:52:55 pm »
Otto Puzzell & MG ,
I have a question.
When did Harold Vance become president of Studebaker?

Did he ride it out until the company closed their doors?

Just curious, because it seems that Ben Harris ties into many events held at the Studebaker Proving grounds test track and Flojole ? sp, played in also somehow.

I think that Bosch now owns the old facilities, not 100% sure though.
Always searching out leads for Bens story, which takes us into many greats in automobile history.

Look to hear back, if you know anything about Vance's time at Studebaker/ packard towards the end.
John
« Last Edit: July 15, 2012, 01:23:40 pm by motorcar1 »